Read a sample chapter!

It is up to Abel Dashian—with help from the spirit of Raj Whitehall and a powerful computer known as Center—to stop the tide of barbarians from destroying his people. Abel is a heretic, but now he must become—THE SAVIOR.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

As war breaks out on Elfhome and riots rock New York City, twin geniuses Louise and Jillian Mayer must use science and magic to save their baby brother and sisters.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

The dapper Lord Thomas Kinago finds himself in danger when he investigates a smuggling ring that is quite determined to “cancel” him before he puts a stop to their illegal contraband trade.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

Time travel and lost worlds in these stories from best-selling master of science fiction David Drake.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

The hottest military science fiction series of all time continues with stories from Jane Lindskold, Timothy Zahn, and other great writers. Plus, an all-new David-Weber-authored novella featuring Honor Harrington.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

When Captain Ivan encounters a damsel fleeing the violent overthrow of her home planet, it’s soon evident that his carefree days are over. For Ivan must make the ultimate sacrifice: his hard-won freedom from the politics of empire.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

Twenty-five men and women against a world of evolution gone mad! Here is the vivid story of their adventures and terrors - the monster in the forest - the city of giant beavers - and the secret of the incredible race that had supplanted mankind.

Buy
More

Read a sample chapter!

The meta-humans are back! ECHO may have struck a blow against the Thulians, but the trans-dimensional baddies are far from down for the count, as they continue their attack on Earth and on ECHO headquarters around the globe. Meta-human Red Savior has a plan: risk everything to find the Thulian Headquarters in a dangerous gambit that will either end with the world in flames—or victory!

More
Buy

Read a sample chapter!

The means streets of Undercity, the enormous capital of a vast star empire. Here former Imperial Space Command officer turned Private Investigator Major Bhaajan must sift through the shadows to find answers to an incredible secret that may change the future itself forever. An all-new science fiction detective series set in the Skolian Empire from Nebula award winner Catherine Asaro.

More
Buy

Read a sample chapter!

When an informant shows up dead on his doorstep, Jason Wood of Wood’s Information Service is plunged into a world far stranger than he ever imagined. Jason has three weapons against the sinister occult forces arrayed against him: his psychic girlfriend, his ancient vampire best friend, and his ability to think beyond the box to see a solution no one else imagined. For Jason Wood knows that against the darkness of the unknown, the greatest weapon is the light of reason.

More
Buy

September Contest

In a world of muskets, bows and arrows, and reptile-riding nomads, a young warrior fights against an all-controlling computer devoted to stasis. Now, enter to win signed copies of both The Heretic and its sequel, The Savior from masters of SF, Tony Daniel and David Drake.

Details here

The Honorverse is getting even bigger! Check out the new additions to the worlds of David Weber here.

We email a twice monthly newsletter that announces exclusive new Baen.com content such as original short stories by your favorite Baen writers, scintillating essays and think-pieces by star contributors, and author interviews. This newsletter also provides highlights of monthly releases in Ebooks, hard covers, and paperbacks complete with synopses and links to sample chapters. Click to view the most recent newsletter.

Enter your email address
here to sign up!

Cover artist Alan Pollack chats with Baen about creating eye-catching book covers, how he came to be a professional artist, and why Larry Correia’s books are so much fun to illustrate.

Read “Alan Pollack Interview” here

Check out the Baen Teacher's Guide to Treecat Wars, the latest in our popular series of teacher’s guides for Baen books that might be appropriate for high school or college classroom reading. These includes synopses, discussion questions, quizzes, and more. Our latest reader’s group guide is 1636: The Devil’s Opera Reader's Group Guide, useful for your book club, online reading group, and to enhance your own enjoyment of the book.

Click to download this month’s teacher's guide

Click to download this month’s reader's group guide

Baen Teacher and Student Guide Catalog


When the mantis aliens attack the human colony known as New America, it’s up to Chief Warrant Officer Amelia Schumann and her crew to get word of the renewed threat to Earth. But a crash landing on a hostile planet complicates things. Now, the crew of the seven-man picket ship must do whatever it takes to get off planet and warn Earth. But Amelia and her crew aren’t the only ones planet-side. The world on which they’ve crash landed is being primed for mantis colonization, and the mantis Queen Mother has given her hive-mind children a clear directive: exterminate all humans.


Picket Ship

by Brad R. Torgersen

The seven-man picket ship bucked and slewed wildly as it flew through thick, turbulent air. Tall spires—the trunks of temperate marshland trees—whipped past the forward canopy while Chief Warrant Officer Amelia Schumann fought for control. Computerized alarm bells screamed in her ears. There had been too much battle damage. Coming down from orbit had made things worse. Schumann slammed her throttles wide open, pulling the control stick into her stomach and willing the vessel to gain altitude.

No good. The little spacecraft shuddered horribly. Piece by ragged piece, chunks of the starboard retractable aero wing peeled off. The control surfaces of the tail planes also remained frozen—their power leads cut by hostile fire.

A large hill loomed in the distance. It was all Amelia could do to nudge the nose of her vessel a few centimeters to port, hoping desperately to avoid the bluff.

Too little, too late.

The belly of the picket ship caromed off the top of the hill, sending it ass-over-teakettles, to come crashing into the middle of the huge trees on the other side. Chief Schumann screamed, every muscle in her body clenching up—waiting for the end to come. Branches and leaves smashed through the ruined canopy, whipping the cockpit and tearing viciously at her flight armor.

Cloudy water suddenly flooded the cockpit and immersed Amelia’s helmet as she hung upside down in her seat. The flight armor should have sealed tight to the helmet when the cockpit was compromised, but something was wrong. Water began to flow around Amelia’s scalp, reaching upwards to cover her eyes, then her nose. Amelia screamed and fought with the restraints of her seat as the water flooded her sinuses, cut off her air supply: stinking, choking, killing. Schumann writhed and banged back and forth in her seat, the straps holding her in a death grip as her wrecked spacecraft sank, sank, sank—


Click here to continue reading the story...






K.D. Julicher is the first place winner of the 2014 Baen Fantasy Adventure Award, announced at GenCon, the premiere gaming convention, in August. The award goes to the best piece of original short fiction that captures the spirit and tradition of such great storytellers as Larry Correia, Robert E. Howard, Mercedes Lackey, Elizabeth Moon, Andre Norton, J.R.R. Tolkien and David Weber. More information on the contest can be found here.


The Golden Knight

by K. D. Julicher

I knew the boy was going to be trouble the moment he walked into the tavern. He glared about, his hand on his sword’s hilt. “All right, where’s the joker who sent me on that fool’s errand?” he demanded.

The other patrons erupted in laughter and deep inside me, my bear growled. I eyed the boy from my table in the corner. He wasn’t from around here, not with that accent. His tunic hadn’t been washed in weeks and he’d patched the rips himself, from the look of it, but the cut said he’d paid good money for them once.

“Fool’s errand?” Wil drawled. He set down his mug and turned away from the bar. “What, you didn’t find what you were looking for?” His mocking voice grated on me like it did when he’d comment on my limp.

The boy’s eyes narrowed. Though as tall as most of the men in the room, he gave off a gawky air. If he picked a fight with Wil he was going to get a beating. My bear was restless but I wasn’t in the mood to see a fight. It was time to leave. You’re never in the mood for a fight any more, the bear whispered.

The boy folded his arms. “I asked where I could find Prince Garadon and you pointed me right off a cliff.”

I stiffened and turned away. Someone snooping around after the prince could mean trouble. Yes, trouble, the bear whispered gleefully. Something, anything to wake you up.

It’s nothing to do with me, I told the bear. Not anymore.

“Aye.” Wil drank again. “Paul, another! So did you find him?”

I glanced at the boy. He scowled. “After I climbed down the cliff, I found the graves.”

“Oh good, then you did find the prince.” Wil shrugged. I couldn’t see his face but he must have been wearing that mocking grin, the one that always reminded me of my father. He picked up the fresh mug of beer. “Him and most of his men.”

The boy shook his head, his scowl unchanged. He took another step into the room. “Impossible.”


Click here to continue reading the story...







The launch by the Soviets of Sputnik in October of 1957 changed the world forever. In the fifty-seven years since, we’ve grown accustomed to man-made satellites orbiting our world, providing hi-resolution images, weather tracking, and the latest episodes of our favorite television shows—and much, much more. But maybe we shouldn’t take these artificial moons for granted. In this month’s free nonfiction article, NASA scientist and author Dr. Les Johnson shows us the many ways out system of satellites could fail. And what it would be like living in a world without them.



Living without Satellites

by Les Johnson

Gravity was a fun movie that didn’t seem to care if it got the science ‘right.’ In portraying the very real threat of space junk destroying our satellites and space stations, Gravity was conceptually correct, but the timeline in which such destruction might occur was extremely compressed. Unfortunately, the threat posed by space junk is real and it isn’t the only reason we might have to learn to live without satellites…


Time Zero

Somewhere in Low Earth Orbit, a few hundred miles above the Earth

The weather satellite was old. It was launched into space in 1972 and had done its job well until it was turned off in 1983 as its replacement was finally finished and lofted into orbit to replace it. Having long outlived its useful life, the once state-of-the-art satellite, weighing 1580 pounds, was now just a dead piece of metal orbiting the Earth at 17,500 miles per hour. Nothing much had happened near the old satellite since the rocket that carried it into space those many years before had sent it on its way to circle the globe every ninety minutes. Since it was launched, it had orbited the Earth nearly 250,000 times – traveling over nine billion miles.

The weather satellite’s orbit crossed that of many other satellites and many more pieces of orbital debris, but the probability of it being in the same place at the same time as anything else was rather small. After all, space is big. Space is very big and, compared to the volume of space around the Earth, the volume occupied by the weather satellite was very small. The probably of it colliding with another object in space on any given orbit was small, but, unfortunately, the laws of probability finally caught up with the weather satellite. After more than a quarter of a million orbits, even a low probability event might actually happen. And happen it did.

An old Soviet-era rocket booster was orbiting the Earth at the same altitude but at a slightly different inclination. (Orbital inclination is simply another way of saying at what angle the orbit makes compared to the equator.) Their orbits crossed in two places and it was at one of these crossing points that the unlikely event occurred.

The rocket booster had launched a Cold War era spy satellite that was lofted into space by the Soviet Union. The booster was out of fuel and had no way to propel itself back into the atmosphere to burn up, so its masters had simply cataloged its orbital location and forgot about it. After all, the country that launched it into space didn’t exist anymore. The booster also circled the Earth every ninety minutes at 17,500 miles per hour.

The two objects approached the same physical location in space at a relative velocity of over 30,000 miles per hour. When the weather satellite collided with the old rocket stage there was no sound – there was no air to carry any sound - but there was a flash. Given that the satellite and the rocket stage were each traveling at least twenty times faster than a bullet, both were totally destroyed. The resulting debris cloud consisted of more than ten thousand pieces. Each piece was moving at over 17,000 miles per hour and, as a result of the collision, all five thousand of them were thrown into new orbits. The amount of junk had just grown past the tipping point, raising the probability that a piece of debris would then hit another satellite, destroying it and creating yet more debris, etc. etc. etc.

Click here to continue reading the story...








The Baen Free Radio Hour offers a weekly dose of Baen news, contests, suggestions for developing writers and readers, and, above all, lively discussion with a galaxy of authors, artists, and scientists all around the Baen Books universe. Plus: great audio adaptations of Baen author works, and professional readings of the science fiction and fantasy you love.

Listen here